“California Typewriter”

A documentary on the subject of vintage typewriters and the people who love and repair them is a tad arcane. Yet, this collection of people who understand that no good typewriters are ever going to be made again draws us in.

Like the assemblage  of  Australians who came to love the canetoad, vintage machines get their homage. Though the film can be rather tongue in cheek in  tone, the earnest Tom Hanks tells us that he types almost everyday. In fact, Hanks has a book of short stories each centering on the machine. Published this month, “Uncommon Type: Some Stories ” has gotten good reviews. In “California Typewriter ”, Hanks shows us some of his own collection. He owes over one-hundred.

Hanks is should not the only personality obsessed with the machine. The late Sam Shepherd works in tandem with his Hermès from Switzerland, and compares his composing on it to a kid working on his bike: you can see what you are working with. The songwriter, Pony Blues, tells us that he wants documentation of his writing process. Typewriters are seen as haunted thought. Historian David McCullough and John Mayer also are advocate interviewees.

Viewers learn that Christopher Latham Sholes of Milwaukee invented the typewriter in 1867. Remingtons, Smith-Coronas, Olivettis, Olympias, Hermes, Underwoods, Royals, and Brothers and more are showcased. The Sholes and Glidden exist in 175 museum examples.

A quirky tapestry of machines and characters flow through Director Doug Nichol’s film. The 100% given by Rotten Tomatoes over reaches in my view, but I was engaged by the LA repair shop and the crazy Boston orchestra musicians and artist who were inspired by purpose, sound, and “useless parts”. The typing poet you will experience in New Orleans. And the typewriter key jewelry is appreciated.

Flea markets, the Martin Howard collection of 18th century typewriters, and the 2870 wooden prototype before Remington did metal in 1874 are shown.  Even Indian street typists are part of the celebration. Hanks waxes elegant  on “ the rise of the keys” and “the solidity of  the action”.

Typewriter enthusiasts will find the 113 minute ode to the machine  fly by like a carriage  speedily thrown, while the Typewriter Insurgency Manifesto is over the top.