“Manchester By The Sea”

Oscar calls! Michelle Williams and Casey Affleck, your grief/love scene will go down in the history of cinema as one of the best ever filmed. You both talked over one another and still struck the perfect cord in selfless emotional giving. I defy anyone not to be moved by the caring pain you showed.

If the biblical Job suffered, Lee Chandler ( Casey Affleck) is Job timed ten. Guilt and family and life-changing events slowly fill the scene in flashback sequences. We get to know this Kenneth Lonergan creation~ a working class handyman whose losses seem insurmountable.

There are two scenes that are so natural and heartfelt that the audience collectively sucked in air. This oxygen boost nearly prepared you for the morgue cart ‘s rolling sound, the clenched hands, the slow walk toward the body, the tentative touch before an endearing one, and then the hug and the final brotherly kiss. Affleck’s swift nose wipe is masterful. He absolutely drains this all too familiar event. Michelle Williams is as master-class perfect: a harpy one minute, a tender apologist the next.

The use of slow-motion, the exquisite score, and the incredible writing all contribute to this  contemporary Greek tragedy. Yet, life’s humor is not forgotten. I can’t remember a film that so nailed the psyche of the teenager: exasperatingly self-centered and childishly sweet, attempting to make sense of life with the bravado of a diva. Lee’s nephew and new charge, Patrick, ( Lucas Hedges) is against moving  an hour and a half away after his father Joe’s ( Kyle Chandler) death. “All my friends are here. I play hockey, am in a band, etc..You are a janitor in Quincy: What the hell do you care where you live!”  As Lee becomes the trustee for a 16 -year-old minor, he is aghast:” I was just the back-up!”  When Lee is berated by a passer-by ( a cameo by Kenneth Lonergan) on his parenting skills.  Patrick quips, ” Are you fundamentally unsound ? ”

When Lee tosses his clothes in a box and then carefully wraps three picture frames in individual cloth like rare gems, we sigh for him. When his ex-wife (Michelle Williams) comes to see him pregnant and moving forward with her life, the woman next to me- a seasoned film-goer of opening nights-  burst out, ” the poor man”.  Believe me, this is an emotionally wrenching film, because it so captures the normal details of life. Writer Lonergan is so observant in his recording of the contemporary experience, that he expects you to be equally alert to the “cold, ‘Keep out’ sign ” that mirrors the numbed psyche of our protagonist. The freezer attack scene is equally disarming. Cold reality and the warmth of the community balance each other.

Suspense and humor and incredulous guilt border “Manchester By The Sea”. Like the old motor on the family boat, a piston is ready to blow.  Three shocking sequences keep the story moving. Besides the central event, one is  in the police station, another at a bar.

Lesley Barbra’s score is lovely. The  Manchester scenery misses “Singing Beach, the mansions, and the stone walls and apple orchards, and the yacht club, but the white frame church steeples, and the middle class areas of North Beverly and Quincy are well portrayed. The harbor and nature’s waves seem like apt metaphors. The daily grind can seem uplifting in comparison to the tragedy life can hold. Laugh when you forget where you have parked your car. And remember that fishing off Misery Island can bolster a smile. Kudos  to a fine film!

 

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Christine Muller

Carrying a torch for film is what I have done for over forty years, thus the flambleau flamed when I was urged to start a blog. Saving suitcase loads of ticket stubs was no longer relevent so I had to change the game. Film has been important for me in the classroom and a respite for me outside of it. No other art form seems to edge the frayed seams of life as neatly as when a film is done well. I am happy that over one-hundred countries have citizens viewing my thoughts on Word Press, and a few leaving their own with me. Over eight- hundred comments to date, and over two-hundred films reviewed.

7 thoughts on ““Manchester By The Sea””

  1. I loved your review much more than the film Christine. I am more ambivalent about this film. Sure the acting by Affleck is award-worthy and the filming is superb. But the ‘fight your inner demons’ is cliched and his redemption through family re-connection was predictable from the reading of the will onwards. The flashbacking was frenetic and the finale trite. On the other hand, as you point out, it has classical treatment of tragedy and trauma and the path to redemption. A very mixed bag.

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  2. How the character internalized shame was masterful still. I was surprised by the fire even in flashback. I concur that the ending was close to ” sailing away” , but some hope was necessary if the viewer was to rise from his/her seat.

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  3. It never ceases to amaze me how differently we humans can experience the same story. If there a 500 people in a cinema, there are 500 different stories being experienced. Can you imagine how bland the artform of film would be if we all had exactly the same opinion?

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